Palouse to Cascade -Tekoa Trestle Deck and Rails

Category Overview

State Parks grants help preserve and develop our state’s best outdoor recreation areas by funding new campgrounds and amenities to increase the capacity of our parks, creating new parks, improving park resources, and protecting historical areas. These grants help our state continue to develop our world-class parks system to share our cultural heritage and natural treasures with all of its visitors.

Project Highlights

State Parks will use this grant to renovate a 975 foot historic trestle that connects two portions of the Palouse to Cascades Trail separated by a large valley, highway 270, Hangman creek, and the town of Tekoa. The construction details include removing the existing ties, installation of a concrete deck and safety railing, and performing minor structural repairs. A small portion of the trail surfacing will be renovated to smooth out the approaches to both ends of the trestle. Interpretive and directional signage will also be included. Completing this project will connect approximately 5.5 miles of trail east of the trestle and 28.5 miles of trail west of the trestle resulting in a contiguous 34 mile trail experience that will stretch from Malden to the Idaho border. The primary recreational opportunity provided by this project is non-motorized trail use.

Quick Facts

WWRP Applicant: State Parks Category: State Parks WWRP Grant: $ 1,633,119.00 Applicant Match: 83775 Project Type: Development County: Whitman Legislative District: 9 Status: Active RCO Project # 18-1843

Location Details

The Tekoa Trestle is an iconic structure that is impossible to miss as you drive in on highway 27 from the west heading east. In order to get up to the trestle, the easiest access is probably from Custer street as shown on the attached map.

What is the WWRP

The Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program (WWRP) is a state grant program that creates and conserves local and state parks, wildlife habitat and working farms. The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office administers WWRP grants, and the legislature funds the program.